J Cancer 2018; 9(10):1870-1876. doi:10.7150/jca.23965

Research Paper

The Effect of Marital Status on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survival: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Study

San-Gang Wu 1*, Qing-Hong Zhang2*, Wen-Wen Zhang3*, Jia-Yuan Sun3, Qin Lin 1✉, Zhen-Yu He3✉

1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, People's Republic of China;
2. Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, People's Republic of China;
3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, People's Republic of China.
*San-Gang Wu, Qing-Hong Zhang, and Wen-Wen Zhang contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the role of marital status on survival outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients using a population-based cancer registry.

Methods: Patients with primary NPC diagnosed between 2004 and 2013 were included using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program. Patient demographic, clinicopathologic features, management, and survival outcomes were compared according to marital status. Cause-specific survival (CSS, NPC-related death) for marital status was analyzed.

Results: The data of 3018 patients were included, with 61.4%, 11.1%, 21.8, and 5.6% of patients married, divorced (or separated), single, and widowed, respectively. Widowed patients had the highest proportion of elderly age (p < 0.001), were more likely to be female (p < 0.001), and had more well-to-moderately differentiated (p < 0.001) and node-negative disease (p = 0.038). Widowed patients were also less likely to have received radiotherapy and chemotherapy compared with patients of other marital status (p < 0.001). The 5-year CSS was 76.1%, 70.8%, 73.4%, and 59.8% in the married, divorced, single, and widowed groups, respectively (p = 0.001). Marital status was the independent prognostic factor for CSS. Widowed patients had a significantly increased risk of NPC-related death compared with married (hazard ratio [HR] 2.014, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.477-2.747, p < 0.001), divorced (HR 1.580, 95% CI 1.087-2.295, p = 0.017), and single (HR 2.000, 95% CI 1.402-2.854, p < 0.001) patients. The divorced (p = 0.067) and single (p = 0.949) groups had similar CSS to the married group.

Conclusions: Being widowed was associated with an increased the risk of cancer mortality in NPC compared with being married, divorced, or single.

Keywords: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Marital status, SEER, Survival, Prognosis

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How to cite this article:
Wu SG, Zhang QH, Zhang WW, Sun JY, Lin Q, He ZY. The Effect of Marital Status on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survival: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Study. J Cancer 2018; 9(10):1870-1876. doi:10.7150/jca.23965. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v09p1870.htm