J Cancer 2018; 9(21):3886-3893. doi:10.7150/jca.27960

Research Paper

Impact of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Genetic Polymorphisms on the Progression in Uterine Cervical Cancer

Chung-Yuan Lee1,2,3,#, Soo-Cheen Ng4,5,#, Yi-Hsuan Hsiao4,6, Shun-Fa Yang1,7, Chun-Fang Hsu1, Po-Hui Wang 1,4,5,7,✉

1. Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Chiayi, Taiwan
3. Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Chiayi Campus, Chiayi, Taiwan
4. School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
5. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
6. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan
7. Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
#These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

To date, few studies have explored the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in uterine cervical cancer. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate the involvement of RAGE SNPs in cervical cancer. In total, 117 patients with cervical invasive cancer, 84 with precancerous lesions, and 320 normal women were recruited consecutively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the genotypic frequencies of RAGE SNPs. The results indicated that among the four RAGE SNPs, only the GT/TT genotype of rs184003 was distributed differently between patients with cervical neoplasias and the normal controls, with GG as a reference. Moreover, cervical cancer patients with genotypes TA/AA in rs1800624 exhibited a lower risk of parametrium invasion, moderate-to-poor cell differentiation, and pelvic lymph node metastasis. In conclusion, RAGE SNPs rs1800624 was associated with some clinicopathological variables in cervical cancer.

Keywords: RAGE, single nucleotide polymorphism, uterine cervical cancer, recurrence-free survival, overall survival

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How to cite this article:
Lee CY, Ng SC, Hsiao YH, Yang SF, Hsu CF, Wang PH. Impact of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Genetic Polymorphisms on the Progression in Uterine Cervical Cancer. J Cancer 2018; 9(21):3886-3893. doi:10.7150/jca.27960. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v09p3886.htm