J Cancer 2019; 10(6):1349-1357. doi:10.7150/jca.26511

Research Paper

Prognostic impact of family history of cancer in Southern Chinese patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer

Zhen Su1*, Guo-Rong Zou2*, Yan-Ping Mao3*, Pu-Yun OuYang4, Xiao-Long Cao5, Fang-Yun Xie6✉, Qun Li7✉

1. Panyu central hospital, Cancer Institute of Panyu, Guangzhou, China.
2. Panyu central hospital, Cancer Institute of Panyu, Guangzhou, China.
3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
4. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
5. Panyu central hospital, Cancer Institute of Panyu, Guangzhou, China.
6. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
7. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
*These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Background: First degree family history of cancer is associated with developing esophageal cancer and sparse data is about the impact on poor survival among established esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) patients. In this study, we investigated the prognoses of patients with ESCC with a family history.

Methods: A total of 479 ESCC patients were retrospectively enrolled from a Southern Chinese institution. A positive family history was defined as having malignant cancer among parents and siblings. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regressions were applied for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS).

Results: Among 479 patients, 119 (24.8%) and 68 (14.2%) reported a first-degree family history of cancer and digestive tract cancer, respectively. Compared with patients without a family history of cancer, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with it were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.08-1.82, p=0.011) for death, 1.36 (95% CI, 1.05-1.76, p=0.018) for progression. Similar results were observed in those with a family history of digestive tract cancer (HR=1.69, 95%CI, 1.24-1.98, p=0.001 for death and HR=1.77, 95%CI, 1.30-2.37, p<0.001 for progression, respectively). Furthermore, there was a trend for increasing risk of overall mortality (p=0.021, p=0.004, respectively), and progression (p=0.022, p=0.001, respectively) with an increasing number of affected family members.

Conclusion: A first-degree family history of cancer, especially digestive tract cancer is associated with poor survival for established ESCC patients and plays an important role in prognosis. The patients with a family history of cancer might need a greater intensity of treatment and more frequent follow-up.

Keywords: first degree family history of cancer, digestive tract cancer, esophageal squamous cell cancer, survival, prognosis.

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How to cite this article:
Su Z, Zou GR, Mao YP, OuYang PY, Cao XL, Xie FY, Li Q. Prognostic impact of family history of cancer in Southern Chinese patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer. J Cancer 2019; 10(6):1349-1357. doi:10.7150/jca.26511. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v10p1349.htm