J Cancer 2019; 10(6):1570-1579. doi:10.7150/jca.26847

Review

The Carcinogenic Role of the Notch Signaling Pathway in the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Qinfeng Huang1, Junhong Li2, Jinghui Zheng3, Ailing Wei2✉

1. Graduate School, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 410208, Hunan, China;
2. The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530023, Guangxi, China;
3. Discipline Construction Office, Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530200, Guangxi, China.

Abstract

The Notch signaling pathway, known to be a highly conserved signaling pathway in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis, participates in cell fate decisions that include cellular differentiation, cell survival and cell death. However, other studies have shown that aberrant in Notch signaling is pro-tumorigenic, particularly in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world and has a high mortality rate. Growing evidence supports that Notch signaling plays a critical role in the development of HCC by regulating the tumor microenvironment, tumorigenesis, progression, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Accordingly, overexpression of Notch is closely associated with poor prognosis in HCC. In this review, we focus on the pro-tumorigenic role of Notch signaling in HCC, summarize the current knowledge of Notch signaling and its role in HCC development, and outline the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch signaling in HCC.

Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, Notch signaling pathway, carcinogenesis, therapeutics

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How to cite this article:
Huang Q, Li J, Zheng J, Wei A. The Carcinogenic Role of the Notch Signaling Pathway in the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma. J Cancer 2019; 10(6):1570-1579. doi:10.7150/jca.26847. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v10p1570.htm