J Cancer 2019; 10(17):3950-3957. doi:10.7150/jca.32592 This issue

Research Paper

Anatomical versus Non-anatomical Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Microscope Vascular Invasion: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

Xiao-Ping Zhong1*, Yong-Fa Zhang3*, Jie Mei2, Shao-Hua Li2, Anna Kan2, Liang-He Lu2, Min-Shan Chen2, Wei Wei2✉, Rong-Ping Guo2✉

1. Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, China;
2. Department of Hepatobiliary Oncology of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China;
3. Department of Hepatic Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
*These authors contribute equally to this study.

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Citation:
Zhong XP, Zhang YF, Mei J, Li SH, Kan A, Lu LH, Chen MS, Wei W, Guo RP. Anatomical versus Non-anatomical Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Microscope Vascular Invasion: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis. J Cancer 2019; 10(17):3950-3957. doi:10.7150/jca.32592. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v10p3950.htm

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Abstract

Background: The benefits of anatomical resection (AR) and non-anatomical resection (NAR) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with microscope vascular invasion (MVI) remain unknown. We aimed to investigate the prognostic outcomes of AR and NAR for HCC patients with MVI.

Study Design: A total of 362 consecutive HCC patients diagnosed with MVI after hepatic resection between February 2005 and December 2013 were included in this study. The patient outcomes were compared, and a 1:2 propensity score matching (PSM) analysis was applied to eliminate selection bias.

Results: Before PSM, compared to the NAR group, the AR group contained more patients that exceeded the Milan criteria, with larger, unilobar tumors and higher AST levels. After PSM, 100 patients were classified into the propensity-matched AR group (PS-AR), while 170 were classified into the propensity-matched NAR group (PS-NAR). Baseline data, including liver function and tumor burden measurements, were similar in the matched groups. The respective 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 78.9%, 56.9%, and 51.5% in the PS-AR group and 76.2%, 53.0%, and 42.4% in the PS-NAR group (P = 0.301). The 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 51.1%, 44.7% and 42.0% in the PS-AR group and 44.9%, 34.3% and 26.4% in the PS-NAR group, respectively (P = 0.039). Multivariate analysis identified AR (P=0.025) as an independent favorable prognostic factor for DFS in HCC patients with MVI.

Conclusions: Anatomical resection was superior to non-anatomical resection for improving DFS in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with microscope vascular invasion.

Keywords: Hepatocellular carcinoma, Anatomical resection, Microscope vascular invasion, Propensity score matching, Overall survival, Disease-free survival