J Cancer 2020; 11(8):2133-2138. doi:10.7150/jca.39636 This issue

Research Paper

Common genetic variants in pre-microRNAs are associated with cervical cancer susceptibility in southern Chinese women

Guange Chen1, Mingyao Zhang1, Jiawei Zhu1, Feng Chen1, Danyang Yu1, Anqi Zhang1, Jing He2, Wenfeng Hua3✉, Ping Duan1✉

1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang, China
2. Department of Pediatric Surgery, Guangzhou Institute of Pediatrics, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510623, Guangdong, China
3. Department of Laboratory Medicine and Central Laboratories, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou 510317, Guangdong, China

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Citation:
Chen G, Zhang M, Zhu J, Chen F, Yu D, Zhang A, He J, Hua W, Duan P. Common genetic variants in pre-microRNAs are associated with cervical cancer susceptibility in southern Chinese women. J Cancer 2020; 11(8):2133-2138. doi:10.7150/jca.39636. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p2133.htm

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Abstract

Cervical cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer among females. Polymorphisms in pre-microRNAs have been demonstrated to play critical roles in cancer. However, the roles of pre-microRNA polymorphisms in the aetiology of cervical cancer have not been well documented. We genotyped eight pre-microRNA polymorphisms in 290 cervical cancer patients and 445 cancer-free female controls using quantitative polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan probes. To estimate the association between pre-microRNA polymorphisms and the risk of cervical cancer, an unconditional logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), adjusting for age, menopause, delivery, and abortion. We found that the pre-miR-137 rs1625579 T > G polymorphism was associated with a significant decrease in cervical cancer risk (TG/GG versus TT: adjusted OR (AOR) = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.27-0.81; TG versus TT: AOR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.34-0.91). We also observed a significant association between the pre-miR-27a rs895819 T > C polymorphism and decreased cervical cancer risk (TC/CC versus TT: AOR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.44-0.96). Stratified analysis further demonstrated that the pre-miR-137 rs1625579 T > C and pre-miR-27a rs895819 T > C polymorphisms significantly reduced the risk of cervical cancer susceptibility in patients younger than 49 years, those who experienced fewer abortions, and clinical stage I patients. Moreover, the pre-miR-137 rs1625579 T > G polymorphism showed protective effects in premenopausal women, squamous cell carcinoma patients, and patients with unclassified types of pathologies; the pre-miR-27a rs895819 T > C polymorphism was also associated with a decreased risk in patients older than 49 years, menopausal women, and women who had experienced vaginal pregnancies. The pre-miR-137 rs1625579 T > G and pre-miR-27a rs895819 T > C polymorphisms may provide protective effects against susceptibility to cervical cancer risk.

Keywords: case-control study, cervical cancer, pre-microRNA, polymorphism, genetic susceptibility