J Cancer 2020; 11(16):4823-4831. doi:10.7150/jca.44126 This issue

Research Paper

Research trends on the relationship between Microbiota and Gastric Cancer: A Bibliometric Analysis from 2000 to 2019

Tongchao Zhang1#, Xiaolin Yin1#, Xiaorong Yang2,3, Jinyu Man1, Qiufeng He1, Qiyun Wu4, Ming Lu1,2,3✉

1. Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250012, China.
2. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Qilu Hospital, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250012, China.
3. Clinical Research Center of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250012, China.
4. Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, 226001, China.
#Co-first authors.

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Citation:
Zhang T, Yin X, Yang X, Man J, He Q, Wu Q, Lu M. Research trends on the relationship between Microbiota and Gastric Cancer: A Bibliometric Analysis from 2000 to 2019. J Cancer 2020; 11(16):4823-4831. doi:10.7150/jca.44126. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p4823.htm

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Abstract

Background: Hundreds of studies have found that the microbiota contributes to the development of gastric cancer in the past two decades. This study aimed to access the research trends of microbiota and gastric cancer.

Materials and Methods: Publications from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2019 were retrieved from the Web of Science Core Collection database and screened according to inclusion criteria. Different kinds of software, SPSS21.0, HistCite, VOSviewer, CiteSpace, and the online bibliometric analysis platform were used to evaluate and visualize the results.

Results: A total of 196 publications were finally identified, and the annual number of publications showed an increasing trend. These publications were from 44 countries and the USA showed its dominant position in publication outputs, H-index, total citations, and international collaborations. The journal of Helicobacter was the most productive journal. Correa P and Peek RM published the most papers, and the most productive institution was Vanderbilt University. The keyword of “Helicobacter pylori” ranked first in research frontiers and appeared earlier, and the keyword of “microbiota” began to appear in the past 3 to 5 years.

Conclusion: The annual number of publications would continue to grow. Besides the traditional Helicobacter pylori related researches, future research hotspots will focus on microbiota and its mechanism of action.

Keywords: Gastric Cancer, Microbiota, Bibliometric Analysis, Research trend