J Cancer 2020; 11(20):5890-5899. doi:10.7150/jca.46343 This issue

Research Paper

Diagnostic, clinicopathologic, therapeutic and prognostic value of Plasma Heat Shock Protein 90 levels in patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

Yiyin Zhang1*, Longgang Ni1,2*, Qianqian Li3*, Min Li1, Jiejie Zhu1, Fei Zhang1✉, Kangsheng Gu1✉

1. Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230022, P. R. China.
2. Department of Oncology, Dongfang Cancer Hospital, Huainan, Anhui, 232000, P. R. China.
3. Department of Medical Psychology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230022, P. R. China.
*These authors contributed equally to this work.

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Citation:
Zhang Y, Ni L, Li Q, Li M, Zhu J, Zhang F, Gu K. Diagnostic, clinicopathologic, therapeutic and prognostic value of Plasma Heat Shock Protein 90 levels in patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma. J Cancer 2020; 11(20):5890-5899. doi:10.7150/jca.46343. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p5890.htm

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Abstract

Purpose: Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a critical molecular chaperone for protein folding, intracellular disposition and regulation of tumor biological behavior in the extracellular space. HSP90 has received much attention due to its specific effect in gastrointestinal cancer. This clinical study sought to determine whether HSP90 in plasma may serve as a biomarker in patients with advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma.

Methods: Using human plasma samples of advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma, we investigated the specific value of HSP90 in gastrointestinal cancer from a clinical perspective.

Results: In summary, plasma levels of HSP90 were shown to be higher in patients with gastric cancer (GC) or colorectal cancer (CRC) than in controls with benign gastrointestinal diseases. In both GC and CRC patients, HSP90 was significantly associated with live metastasis. Higher HSP90 levels were more frequent in CRC patients with hazardous or harmful alcohol consumption habits. Patients with RAS mutations had higher HSP90 levels in CRC. Compared with Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), HSP90 benefited patients by enhancing diagnostic sensitivity and the Youden index. The levels of HSP90 were inversely associated with short-term efficacy in GC patients who had received fluorouracil/platinum-based advanced first-line treatment. When first-line therapy failed, plasma HSP90 levels in patients with GC were significantly increased. In terms of progression-free survival (PFS), patients with GC or CRC who had low levels of HSP90 were not significantly different from those with high levels of HSP90. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that HSP90 was not an independent prognostic predictor for GC and CRC patients with PFS. However, RAS mutation was an independent prognostic factor for poor PFS in CRC patients.

Conclusions: Plasma HSP90 levels have potential diagnostic value in advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma and therapeutic predictive value in GC.

Keywords: Gastrointestinal carcinoma, HSP90, Peripheral blood