J Cancer 2020; 11(11):3192-3198. doi:10.7150/jca.40724 This issue

Research Paper

Patients with non-colorectal cancers may be at elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia

Hamzah Abu-Sbeih1, Faisal S. Ali2, Wei Qiao3, Phillip Lum1, Mehnaz A. Shafi1, Robert S. Bresalier1, Ernest Hawk4, Gottumukkala S. Raju1*, Yinghong Wang1*✉

1. Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
2. Department of Internal Medicine, Presence Saint Joseph Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA.
3. Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
4. Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
*co-senior authors

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Citation:
Abu-Sbeih H, Ali FS, Qiao W, Lum P, Shafi MA, Bresalier RS, Hawk E, Raju GS, Wang Y. Patients with non-colorectal cancers may be at elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia. J Cancer 2020; 11(11):3192-3198. doi:10.7150/jca.40724. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p3192.htm

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Abstract

Background: Screening for colonic neoplasia has decreased the incidence of colorectal cancer in the United States in the past two decades. Whether personal history of noncolorectal cancer is a risk factor for colonic neoplasia has not been well studied. We assessed the risk of colorectal neoplasia in noncolorectal cancer survivors.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients who had undergone colonoscopy for any indication between 2009 and 2018. Colonic adenoma detection rate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted to assess for the primary outcomes of the study.

Results: The study included 9408 cancer patients and 3295 control patients. Colonic adenomas were detected in 4503 cancer patients (48%) and 950 cancer-free patients (29%). Histologic examination of these adenomas revealed tubulovillous features in 620 patients (5%) and villous in 153 (1%). High-grade dysplasia was detected in 1611 patients (13%). Invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma was detected in 455 patients (12%); this rate was highest in patients with multiple myeloma (14%). Multivariate analysis revealed that a personal history of noncolorectal cancer was associated with increased risk of adenoma (Odd ratio, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.84-2.26; P<0.001). The adenoma detection rate was 30% in patients younger than 40 years (n=1211), 32% in patients between 41 and 50 years (n=812), 47% in patients between 51 and 60 years (n=2892), and 55% in patients older than 60 years (n=4493).

Conclusions: The adenoma detection rate in patients with a personal history of noncolorectal cancer is higher than the reported rate of the general population and our control group.

Keywords: colorectal neoplasia, colon adenoma, adenoma detection rate, colorectal cancer, screening, surveillance