J Cancer 2020; 11(18):5449-5455. doi:10.7150/jca.46088 This issue

Research Paper

Association between Socioeconomic Status and One-Month Mortality after Surgery in 20 Primary Solid Tumors: a Pan-Cancer Analysis

Wei Sun1, Huaqiang Zhou2, Minghua Cheng1, Shaohui Zhuang1, Zeting Qiu1✉

1. Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.
2. Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

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Citation:
Sun W, Zhou H, Cheng M, Zhuang S, Qiu Z. Association between Socioeconomic Status and One-Month Mortality after Surgery in 20 Primary Solid Tumors: a Pan-Cancer Analysis. J Cancer 2020; 11(18):5449-5455. doi:10.7150/jca.46088. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p5449.htm

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Abstract

Background: Surgery is the main therapy for primary solid tumors. One-month postoperative mortality remains an important criterion for assessing the quality of surgery. Socioeconomic status (SES) plays an important role in the biopsychosocial medical model. We performed a pan-cancer analysis to explore the relationship between SES and one-month mortality after surgery in 20 primary solid tumors.

Methods: Eight SES factors and the top 20 common cancer sites were selected between 2007 and 2014 based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The primary outcome was that patients died within one month after surgery. The control group survived beyond one month. Multivariable logistic regression model, propensity score matching and subgroup analysis were used to detect the association.

Results: There were 15980 (1.4%) patients who died within one month after surgery among 1132666 patients with primary solid cancers. Patients with unmarried status (aOR 1.516, 95% CI 1.462-1.573, P < 0.001), Medicaid/uninsured status (aOR 1.610, 95% CI 1.534-1.689, P < 0.001), low income (aOR 1.122, 95% CI 1.053-1.196, P < 0.001), low education (aOR 1.088, 95% CI 1.033-1.146, P = 0.001), or high poverty (aOR 1.085, 95% CI 1.026-1.147, P = 0.004) had high risks of one-month postoperative mortality. After propensity score matching and subgroup analysis, the effects of marriage and insurance on mortality were almost consistent with overall.

Conclusions: There was a strong association between SES status and one-month postoperative mortality in primary solid tumors. Socioeconomically disadvantaged people had high risks of dying within one month after surgery. Unmarried or Medicaid/uninsured status were associated with much higher risks than other factors.

Keywords: Socioeconomic status, One-month postoperative mortality, Solid tumor, Pan-cancer analysis